The management and uses conditions of our funded trees as of June 2020

Project Land Use Categories Goal Forest/Tree Use Rights
Trees for life - India (Isha Foundation-Project GreenHands) Small farms (less than 5 hectares in size). Perennial tree crops for livelihood. Trees may be cut down or used economically, however provision of non-timber products, livestock fodder, and fuelwood do not necessarily involve cutting down trees.
The Mount Bamboutos Initiative - SouthWestern Cameroon (ITF) Public forest estate (streamside/riparian forests, sacred groves and Forest Reserves). Natural forest rehabilitation and protection. Trees cannot be cut down or used economically.
  Community Forests - (State-owned, forest uses in communities' hands under a renewable, 25-year lease). Community Forestry (semi-natural forest (1) rehabilitation for livelihood). Timber and non-timber products (2) may be harvested without removing the forest, as per sustainable forestry rules. (3)
  Sacred groves (owned by village traditional councils). Natural forest rehabilitation and protection. Trees cannot be cut down or used economically.
  Small farms (Private (individual) land for agroforestry development). (4) Agroforestry development (perennial tree crops for livelihood and enhanced farming production system). Trees may be cut down or used economically. However provision of non-timber products, livestock fodder, and fuelwood do not necessarily involve cutting down trees.
Mount Kenya Forest Landscape Restoration Project - Kenya (ITF) Forest Reserves found in the Mount Kenya National Park/Natural Forest. Semi-natural forest rehabilitation and protection. Trees cannot be cut down or used economically. Timber extraction, either for commercial or subsistence, is prohibited under State legislation.
Restoration of the Atlantic Forest - Brazil (WeForest) Permanent Preservation Areas (APPs), a registered protection buffer on private farmlands along the banks of rivers, springs, and lakes. Natural forest rehabilitation (framework planting of native species and Assisted Natural Regeneration) to protect water resources and reduce soil erosion. Trees cannot be cut down or used economically. A no harvest zone, except in special cases of public utility, social interest or low environmental impact. (5)
  Legal Forest Reserves (LRs), a registered protection area on private farmlands. Natural forest rehabilitation (framework planting of native species and Assisted Natural Regeneration) to preserve the remnants of native vegetation and to conserve biodiversity.

Cover of native vegetation cannot be suppressed. However, collection of non-timber forest products is free under safeguarding principles. Commercial exploitation is possible through sustainable management and authorization by the competent environmental agency. It prohibits clear-cutting; use of agrochemicals; conversion into other land cover/land use. (6)

Restoring the Khasi Hills forests - India (WeForest) Sacred forests and watershed forests. Natural forest rehabilitation and protection.

Trees cannot be cut down or used economically.

  Clan forests. (7) Natural forest rehabilitation and protection and limited livelihood activities (wild harvesting and selling of wild mushrooms and herbs).

Fruits/fuelwood may be collected under certain rules decided by the clan (e.g. harvest poor quality, dry wood and dead trees).

Mangrove Restoration Project - Madagascar (Eden Reforestation Projects)

Public mangroves, co-managed with adjacent communities. Natural mangrove rehabilitation and protection.

Trees cannot be cut down or used economically. Customary rules and an agreement with the community ban any mangrove tree cutting. Commercial timber extraction of mangroves is forbidden by law.  

  Communal land. Perennial tree crops for livelihood.

Trees may be cut down or used economically, however provision of non-timber products, livestock fodder, and fuelwood do not necessarily involve cutting down trees.

Dry Deciduous Forest Restoration - Madagascar (Eden Reforestation Projects)

Public land, owned by the Government, co-managed with adjacent communities. Natural forest rehabilitation, protection and conservation of wildlife (potentially ecotourism in the future).

Forests will be under protection when land will be gazetted as a natural forest area, where trees cannot be cut down or used economically.

Bela Vista Mangrove Reforestation project - Mozambique (Eden Reforestation Projects)

Communal land (held by communities). Only natural mangrove rehabilitation and protection (to date).

Trees cannot be cut down or used economically. This is ensured through written agreements with the community and designating the restoration sites as protected in perpetuity.

The Terai Forest Restoration Project - Nepal (Eden Reforestation Projects) Community Forests and Collaborative Forests, State-owned co-managed with rural communities. (8) Natural forest rehabilitation and livelihood.

Tree logging and other uses are forbidden by contractual commitment with the communities. A minimum of 10% of the trees are planted for livelihood among the regrowing forest, and may be extracted.

Yapen Forest Restoration - West Papua (Eden Reforestation Projects)


Communal land (community ownership and use). Natural forest (protection).

Trees cannot be cut down or used economically, by law and guaranteed by a contractual commitment with the community.

Yorenka Tasorentsi’s Forest Garden - Brazilian Amazon (Aquaverde)


Benki Piyãko, an Ashaninka trusted leader and shaman holds the land and resources ownership rights. The land was acquired and is reserved for the well-being the Ashaninka indigenous tribe. Perennial tree crops for livelihood.

Non-timber products will be harvested  for the benefit of the Ashaninka community of Kampa do Rio Amônia and non-indigenous locals of Marechal Thaumaturgo, and used economically. Trees may be cut down in times when no longer producing but will be replanted.


Footnotes

 (1) Semi-natural forests are forests which present some of the characteristics and key elements of native ecosystems (complexity, structure and diversity). They are modified by humans through silviculture and other land-use practices. This category excludes plantations which differ greatly from natural forest ecosystems).
(2) Non-timber products include fruits, seeds/nuts, fibers, medicines, and livestock fodders, etc.
(3)
 Logging and other forest uses are limited by a simple forest management plan, and a duly signed Final Management Agreement (FMA) signed between the community and the government. This is regulated by the Forestry law No 94 of 20th January 1994 and the 1995 Forestry Policy in Cameroon and the community forestry law of 1998. The community forest thus becomes legally protected and managed in a sustainable manner by the community members, with the technical assistance of the forestry administration and/or any environment-oriented organisation.
(4) According to the Land Act of 1974 in Cameroon and ministerial ordinances, all land belongs to the state. For conservation and/or development projects, a consensus must be reached between the state and the local community members, and maintain control over their usufruct.
(5)  Laudares, Sarita Soraia de Alcântara, Luís Antônio Coimbra Borges, José Luiz Pereira de Rezende, Marcondes Lomeu Bicalho, Vanessa Cabral Costa de Barros, Sarita Soraia de Alcântara Laudares, Luís Antônio Coimbra Borges, José Luiz Pereira de Rezende, Marcondes Lomeu Bicalho, and Vanessa Cabral Costa de Barros. “New Contours of the Native Vegetation Protection Law of 2012.” Floresta e Ambiente 26, no. 4 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1590/2179-8087.061216.
(6)  Laudares, Sarita Soraia de Alcântara, Luís Antônio Coimbra Borges, José Luiz Pereira de Rezende, Marcondes Lomeu Bicalho, Vanessa Cabral Costa de Barros, Sarita Soraia de Alcântara Laudares, Luís Antônio Coimbra Borges, José Luiz Pereira de Rezende, Marcondes Lomeu Bicalho, and Vanessa Cabral Costa de Barros. “New Contours of the Native Vegetation Protection Law of 2012.” Floresta e Ambiente 26, no. 4 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1590/2179-8087.061216.
(7)
Owned by the indigenous Khasi tribe. Governed and managed by the clans or groups (no direct authorities controlling management, not even the district community council).
(8)
 Community Forestry in Nepal gives communities significant control in the management and harvest of forest resources.